Google’s weird, troubling and probably-desperate embrace of adblocking

plan ahead funny

By now you’ve probably heard the news: Google has announced that they’re maybe, possibly, thinking about adding native adblocking options to their Chrome browser.

Chrome’s?native adblocking?feature, may or may not be turned on by default.

Google is the largest advertising-supported business on Earth, deriving nearly?90% of their?$90 billion in revenue from advertising.

Google’s announcement that they may be rolling a native adblocker into their Chrome browser raises some troubling questions — but also gives us some interesting insight into the troubled state of online advertising today.

chrome browser graph

Trouble in Ad Land

 

See:?https://seekingalpha.com/article/3979743-google-happens-ad-business-faces-challenges

See:?http://www.adweek.com/digital/googles-ad-revenue-hits-19-billion-even-mobile-continues-pose-challenges-172722/

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Include rise of mobile adblocking, total shift to mobile… In other words: Ad revenue isn’t looking good.

Include the renaming to Alphabet

Include the increasing “keep users within Google’s garden” trend.

INCLUDE:?http://fortune.com/2017/04/20/google-ad-blocker/

 

If there’s going to be a viable post-advertising model, driving users towards an adblocked web which isn’t controlled by Google?is a bad move for Google. For that matter, driving?users to anywhere but Google is a bad move for Google.

Which is why the real danger to Google is no longer adblocking. It’s losing control of the exits. It’s not that Google is losing monetizable impressions (That damage is already a foregone conclusion at this point unless Google embraces reinsertion). It’s that they may be losing control over whatever revenue model comes next. In order to control that transition, Google must prevent adblocking companies from gaining control of the conversation – and of any?significant percentage of its users.

Needless to say, the adblocking disaster (and it is very much a disaster) was largely brought about by Google. Google foolishly?promoted Adblock Plus at the top of its Chrome Web Store and believed that adblocking would remain a fringe trend.

 

 


 

The biggest loser

INCLUDE: Big loser Eyeo… public embrace of Google’s plan was a well-crafted show of nonchalance despite the fact that they’re obviously the biggest loser here. If Eyeo isn’t seeing the cliff-edge approaching then they’re not paying attention.